Written Answers: February

Written Answers: February

2nd February

Police: Road Traffic Control
Jack Dromey (Birmingham, Erdington): To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many traffic police officers were employed in each police force area in each of the last five years.
Mike Penning: The table provided shows the number and proportion of full-time equivalent police officers within the traffic function for each police force area in England and Wales, as at 31 March 2010 to 31 March 2014.
Pedestrian Crossings
Richard Burden (Birmingham, Northfield): To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the criteria are by which he will assess whether the new Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions have improved safety, accessibility and amenity for pedestrians crossing the road.
Mr Robert Goodwill: There are no such criteria. Assessing the safety, accessibility and amenity for pedestrians crossing the road is beyond the scope of the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions (TSRGD). Such assessments remain a matter for traffic authorities for individual locations. The purpose of TSRGD is to prescribe traffic signs that can be used on the highway.
Aviation: Safety
Mr Gregory Campbell (Londonderry): To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will hold discussions with the Civil Aviation Authority on requiring airlines operating in UK airspace to have wind shear detection and alert systems fitted to commercial aircraft.
Mr Robert Goodwill: International civil aviation is governed by the Convention on International Civil Aviation. Under the Convention, the International Civil Aviation Organisation is responsible for establishing the minimum safety standards for international aviation. Subject to compliance with those international standards, the State in which the aircraft is registered is responsible for determining what equipment it should carry. Within the EU, aircraft equipment requirements are introduced through EU legislation adopted on the advice of the European Aviation Safety Agency. There are currently no plans to introduce EU legislation to require the carriage of wind shear detection and alert systems on aircraft registered in EU Member States. We believe that this position is reasonable because the Civil Aviation Authority is not aware of any safety case which would justify the introduction of such a requirement.

3rd February

Roads: Accidents

Richard Burden (Birmingham, Northfield): To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment his Department has made of the effect on the number of accidents of road speed limits in built up areas.

Mr Robert Goodwill: Authorities have been introducing more 20 mph limit and zone schemes across the country, including some which cover very large areas (such as Portsmouth). As the number of zones increase we would expect the number of accidents on 20 mph-limited roads to increase, simply as a consequence of the zones becoming more prevalent. This is not an indication that the 20 mph-limited roads are becoming more dangerous, but rather a reallocation of accidents from 30 mph-limited roads to 20 mph-limited roads. Atkins, and AECOM and Professor Mike Maher from UCL, have been commissioned to carry out research into the effectiveness of 20mph limits. The study will cover many aspects including effects on speed, collisions, casualties and modal shift. The research will also consider best practice, road users’ perceptions and effects on the quality of the environment.

The attached tables show the reported accidents by speed limit, road class and severity in GB for 2010 to 2013.


4th February

Invalid Vehicles: Accidents

Mr Clive Betts (Sheffield, South East): To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many people have been killed or seriously injured in accidents involving mobility scooters in each of the last five years; and how many of the people so killed or seriously injured were driving the scooter.

Mr Robert Goodwill: The Department does not hold comprehensive data on personal injury road accidents involving motorised mobility scooters. Data on this issue was first collected (on a non-mandatory basis) in 2011, with 1 out of 51 Police forces in Great Britain supplying data in 2011; 12 in 2012; and 24 in 2013. Across these forces, the number of reported personal injury road accidents involving mobility scooters and the number of drivers of these vehicles who were injured is given in table. The data for earlier years are not available.

The Department is working to obtain data on this issue from all forces by 2016.

Number of casualties in reported accidents involving mobility scooters
in Great Britain: 2011-2013
Severity 2011(1) 2012(2) 2013(3)
Killed 0 1 5
Serious 6 17 26
Slight 4 69 133
All severities 10 87 164
(1) Data from only 1 police force
(2) Data from 12 police forces
(3) Data from 24 police forces
Number of mobility scooter drivers injured in reported accidents in Great Britain: 2011 -2013
Severity 2011(1) 2012(2) 2013(3)
Killed 0 1 5
Serious 4 11 17
Slight 1 42 102
All severities 5 54 124
(1) Data from only 1 police force
(2) Data from 12 police forces
(3) Data from 24 police forces

The increases in the numbers of casualties and drivers is related to the increase in the number of police forces providing the data. Until all forces provide data, the Department will not have any meaningful trend data.

 


 

5th February

Speed Limits

Sir Greg Knight (East Yorkshire): To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will take steps to encourage local authorities to make greater use of part-time 20mph zones that are in force during times of greater need and not on a 24 hour basis; and if he will make a statement.

Mr Robert Goodwill: Traffic authorities have powers to introduce 20 mph zones or speed limits that apply only at certain times of day. The Department issued revised guidance in January 2013 aimed mainly at local traffic authorities who are responsible for setting speed limits on local roads. It has been designed to help explain to everyone why and how local speed limits are determined. This guidance was revised following full public consultation in Summer 2012. The guidance is available online on GOV.UK


9th February

Road Traffic Offences
Richard Burden (Birmingham, Northfield): To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) arrests were made and (b) prosecutions conducted for road traffic offences in each of the last five years.
Mike Penning: The Home Office has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

More information on written questions is available here on the parliamentary website.

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