2018 road casualty summary figures published by DfT – PACTS provides breakdown by administration

2018 road casualty summary figures published by DfT – PACTS provides breakdown by administration

The Department for Transport published the detailed 2018 road casualty data for Great Britain on 27th September 2019. This showed:

  • 1,784 people died in road collisions – a 1% decline on the previous year – continuing the “plateau” in GB road deaths since 2010.
  • 25,511 seriously injured casualties reported. Due to changes in recording methods, comparisons with previous years may be misleading for seriously injured casualty numbers.*
  • 133,112 slightly injured casualties reported. Adjusted figures from the NAO show a continuation in the downward trend since 2014.

Reported Road Casualties in Great Britain: Annual Report 2018, DfT, September 2019, is here.

PACTS has provided a breakdown by Administration, including Highways England and Norther Ireland, in the table below; additional details here Road Deaths and Serious Injuries across UK 2018 – Breakdown by PACTS

Region/Administration 2017 Deaths 2018 Deaths Change % Change
North East 58 52 -6 -10.3
North West 167 194 +27 +16.2
Yorkshire and the Humber 160 182 +22 +13.8
East Midlands 182 196 +14 +7.7
West Midlands 191 173 -18 -9.4
East of England 200 170 -30 -15.0
South East 267 258 -9 -3.4
London 131 112 -19 -14.5
South West 188 184 -4 -2.1
Wales 103 103 0 0.0
Scotland 146 160 +14 +9.6
England 1,544 1,521 -25 -1.5
Northern Ireland 63 55 -8 -13
GB Total 1,793 1,784 -9 -0.5
UK Total 1,856 1,839 -17 -0.9
Highways England 236 250 +14 +5.6

* The ONS has completed analysis of the changes in recording methods of serious and slight injuries. This has allowed the DfT to produce an adjusted figure for serious injuries which can be compared to previous years. For 2018, this figure is 28,122, a 2% increase on 2017.

Further trend analysis and information is provided in PACTS report Road Safety Since 2010 – Update

In 2014 PACTS published Projections of road casualties in Great Britain to 2030. The 2018 casualty data are well above the long-term trend.

[Post corrected 15.10]
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