PQs 18th – 20th July 2011

Bus Services: Rural Areas
Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what his most recent estimate is of the projected level of access to local bus services in rural communities in each of the next four financial years. [66364]
Norman Baker: We have estimated that the planned reduction in Bus Service Operators Grant from April 2012 will result in a 2% reduction in bus service mileage in rural areas. The level of tendered services provided is a matter for the relevant local authority.
Statistics on the availability of bus services in rural areas can be found on the Department website at the following address:
http://www2.dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics/datatablespublications/nts/accessibility-service/nts0801.xls
Statistics on the accessibility of key services by public transport in rural areas can be found on the Department website at the following address:
http://assets.dft.gov.uk/statistics/worksheets/acs0102.xls
PACTS comments: This is a very significant question and answer as the UK’s ageing population will be concentrated in rural areas. If older people have stopped driving or do not have access to a car, they need safe and reliable methods of transport to be able to access services. 
Motorways: Speed Limits
Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the oral answer to the hon. Member for City of Chester of 23 June 2011, Official Report, column 455, on motorway speed limits, when he plans to publish his consultation on motorway speed limits; if, as part of the consultation, he will ask what the motorway speed limit should be as an open question; if he will consult on what the default speed limits should be on other types of road; and if he will make a statement. [66502]
Mike Penning: Preliminary work reviewing the motorway speed limit is in progress. The primary focus of the current work is reviewing the effects of increasing the 70 mph national speed limit on motorways to 80 mph. If the Government were to propose a change to the motorway speed limit there would be a consultation.
PACTS comments: PACTS believes that an increase of the motorway speed limit to 80 mph would be likely to increase road casualties.  Factors contributing to this include greater speed differentials, longer stopping distances, increased severity of impacts and difficulties regarding enforcement. There are also likely to be adverse effects in terms of vehicle emissions and noise, and overall journey times are unlikely to be reduced. 
Freight
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of trends in modal shift between road freight and rail freight (a) in each year since the introduction of the Mode Shift Revenue Support Grant and (b) in the 10 preceding years. [67423]
Mike Penning: The information is as follows:
(a) No assessment has been made of trends in modal shift between road freight and rail freight since the introduction of the Mode Shift Revenue Support scheme in April 2010. We intend to conduct an assessment when sufficient data are available to detect any shift in trend.
(b) Data on domestic freight transport by mode is compiled annually. Data on the 10 years to 2009 are available in Table 4.1 of “Transport Statistics Great Britain: 2010”
http://www2.dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics/datatablespublications/tsgb/index.html
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Mode Shift Revenue Support Grant in encouraging modal shift of freight. [67424]
Mike Penning: An assessment of the estimated number of lorry journeys removed and the benefits this has delivered has been undertaken for the first full year of the Mode Shift Revenue Support scheme. This indicates that over 900,000 lorry journeys were removed from Britain’s roads as a result of MSRS grant support in the 12 months to 31 March 2011. Approximately 130,000 tonnes of CO2 emissions were thus avoided.
Rural Areas
Julian Smith: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether officials of his Department have had recent discussions with the Rural Communities Policy Unit in the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. [67143]
Norman Baker: Yes, my officials have had recent discussion with the Rural Communities Policy Unit at DEFRA on matters including the rural impacts of DFT’s policies, community transport and the Wheels 2 Work scheme.
Transport: Planning
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what discussions he has had with the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on the implications for transport policy of draft version 4 of the National Planning Policy Framework. [67463]
Mr Philip Hammond: I have held regular discussions on a range of issues with my ministerial colleagues in the Department for Communities and Local Government.
Bus Services
Mr Bone: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of changes in the level of bus services funded by his Department in (a) England and (b) Northamptonshire in the latest period for which figures are available. [61647]
Norman Baker: The latest information on bus statistics in Great Britain can be found on the Department’s website at the following address:
http://www2.dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics/datatablespublications/public/bus/index.html
The charts found at the following addresses may be of particular interest:
http://assets.dft.gov.uk/statistics/worksheets/bus0103.xls
http://assets.dft.gov.uk/statistics/worksheets/bus0109.xls
Bus Services: Concessions
Richard Fuller: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will take steps to ensure that bus passes issued to senior citizens in (a) England are valid for travel in Wales and (b) Wales are valid for travel in England. [65168]
Norman Baker: There are no immediate plans to introduce mutual recognition of concessionary bus passes across the UK. Concessionary travel is a devolved policy area so the arrangements differ between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. The Concessionary Bus Travel Act 2007 contains a power to allow, through future regulations, for mutual recognition of bus passes across the UK. Regular discussions have taken place at official level with the devolved Administrations. However, various technical and resource issues would need to be resolved before mutual recognition could be pursued. Individual local authorities on the England-Wales border are free to introduce arrangements between them to enable concessionary travel across the border, and some indeed have.
Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many pensioners in (a) York Central constituency, (b) City of York, (c) North Yorkshire and (d) England (i) held a concessionary bus pass and (ii) were eligible for concessionary bus travel (A) in May 2010 and (B) at the latest date for which figures are available. [65617]
Norman Baker: The Department is not responsible for issuing bus passes and so does not maintain records of how many passes are held by concessionaires in individual local authority areas. As bus passes are issued by local authorities, the Department has no information regarding bus passes held in parliamentary constituencies.
Population estimates from the Office for National Statistics show that in mid-2010, the latest period for which figures are available, there were 44,900 older people resident in the city of York, 166,700 in North Yorkshire and 11,746,500 resident in England who were of the eligible age for a bus pass. The Department does not hold information as to whether all those eligible people have taken up their entitlement to the bus travel concession. However, the National Travel Survey 2009 estimates that 76% of eligible older people took up their entitlement to bus passes.
Concessions: Pensioners
Hugh Bayley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many (a) pensioners and (b) disabled people in (i) York, (ii) Yorkshire and the Humber and (iii) England received free bus travel and concessions in each year since 2008; and what plans he has for the future of free bus travel in England for older and disabled people. [66001]
Norman Baker: The Department does not maintain records of how many people received the free bus travel concession in individual local authority areas or the breakdown by older people and disabled people. A survey is in progress to collect information at local authority level.
Population estimates from the Office for National Statistics show the numbers of people of eligible age for a bus pass, from mid-year 2008 to mid-year 2010
Thousand
2008 2009 2010

City of York

43.4

44.1

44.9

Yorkshire and the Humber

1,149.4

1,169.8

1,189.0

England

11,324.2

11,541.1

11,746.5

The Department does not hold information as to whether all those eligible people have taken up their entitlement to the bus travel concession. However, the National Travel Survey 2009 estimates that, nationally, 76% of eligible older people took up their entitlement to bus passes.

The right to free bus travel for both older and disabled people is enshrined in primary legislation and, in last year’s spending review, the Chancellor of the Exchequer confirmed the Government’s commitment to protect the free bus travel concession.
Cycling
Tessa Munt: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has to promote cycling to work; and if he will make a statement. [65733]
Norman Baker: The Department has traditionally promoted both the Cycle to Work Scheme and the Cycle to Work Guarantee to employers, employees and other Government Departments through a number of departmental led promotions and projects. The Department also funds the National Business Travel Network (NBTN). NBTN launched a DfT part-funded ‘ways2work’ tool kit in November 2010 to help people and businesses work more efficiently. The tool kit includes a section on encouraging cycling to work.
Most recently the Cycle to Work Scheme has been promoted through guidance to the members of the Physical Activity Network which is part of the Department for Health led Public Health Responsibility Deal. I have also provided a foreword in support of the Cycle to Work Alliance’s Behavioural Impact Analysis.
Finally, the results of bids for Tranche 1 of the Local Sustainable Transport Fund were released on 5 July 2011, many of which included elements relating to cycling to work.
Driving Offences
Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many incidents of road rage there have been in each of the last three years; and what steps he is taking to prevent these incidents. [66636]
Mike Penning: The term ‘road rage’ is used to cover a wide range of aggressive behaviour when one road user assaults another or threatens another due to their behaviour on the road. Unless a serious incident takes place the police do not become involved, and therefore no record of the number of incidents exists.
Contributions towards ‘road rage’ incidents include motoring offences for which the road user may be prosecuted under road traffic offences. The Government’s Strategic Framework for Road Safety includes a proposal to introduce a fixed penalty notice for careless driving, expected to start in 2012. This would allow more people to be offered rehabilitative education to combat behaviour such as ‘tail-gating’, which itself is at times unofficially described as ‘road rage’.
Motorcycles
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps his Department has taken to encourage the development and use of electrically-powered motorcycles. [62378]
Norman Baker: Passenger cars are by some distance the biggest source of emissions from road transport, accounting for almost 60% of total UK domestic CO2 transport emissions compared to less than 1% accounted for by motorcycles. As such, the focus of Government support is on cars where it will have the biggest impact on greenhouse gas emissions from road transport. We recognise that electric motorcycles offer environmental benefits compared to conventional motorcycles and they are already zero rated for VED purposes and exempt from fuel duty. Electric motorbikes are able to access the re-charging infrastructure installed as part of the Plugged in Places programme.
Motorcycles: Driving Tests
Andrew Bridgen: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many motorcycle driving tests in each engine class were taken (a) between April 2008 and March 2009 and (b) between April 2009 and March 2010; and how many test sites were in operation in each period. [67729]
Mike Penning: The number of motorcycle driving tests in each engine class taken between (a) April 2008 and March 2009 and (b) April 2009 and March 2010; and the number of test sites in operation in each period are shown as follows:
Single Event Test Module 1 Module 2
Tests taken Number of sites(1) Tests taken Number of sites Tests taken Number of sites

April 2008 to March 2009

A1—442

(2)225

A2—28,153

(2)

A—78,562

(2)

April 2009 to 26 April 2009

A1—47

(3)173

A2—2,353

(3)

A—6,144

(3)

27 April 2009 to March 2010(4)

A1—380

(5)68

A1—125

(6)114

A2—2,541

(5)

A2—8,760

(6)

A—37,903

(5)

A—29,032

(6)

(1 )Modular testing was introduced on 27 April 2009. (4) Number of sites from which tests have been delivered over the period specified.
Railways: Safety
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps his Department is taking to investigate the circumstances in which two trains came close to collision near Burnham on 4 June 2011. [64132]
Mrs Villiers: The role of the Rail Accident Investigation Branch (RAIB) is to conduct investigations into the types of accident or incident that the industry is obliged to notify us about, which are defined in the Schedules to the Railways (Accident Investigation and Reporting) Regulations 2005.
The event on 4 June 2011 at Burnham occurred after the signaller at Slough had authorised a train to pass signal DM20 at danger. During the previous day, there had been signal failures caused by vandalism between Taplow and Burnham and work continued during the morning of the 4th to repair the problems which had led to some signals in the area being held at red.
Operational procedures exist to cover such situations which may arise, for example because the signal itself is defective. When a signaller permits a driver to pass a signal at danger, the driver is instructed to proceed at caution and be prepared to stop short of any obstruction.
On this occasion, the signaller incorrectly instructed the driver to pass the signal at danger. However, the driver correctly applied the Rule Book procedure and ensured that the train proceeded slowly and was able to stop well short of the train ahead, without the use of emergency braking. Consequently, while the trains where physically in relatively close proximity (circa 100 yards), they were not at risk of collision. Under these circumstances, the event was not notifiable to the RAIB according to the legislation.
However, it had been identified by the RAIB duty co-ordinator, from the daily log provided by Network Rail, as an incident where further information should be obtained. As a result, the RAIB decided that it was appropriate to leave the investigation to the industry, who themselves have a duty to investigate.
Road Signs and Markings
Mark Garnier: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the (a) visibility and (b) distance criteria are for the installation of solid double white lines on class (i) A, (ii) B and (iii) C roads in England. [62512]
Norman Baker: Visibility and distance criteria for solid double white lines are not regulated. The Traffic Signs Manual, Chapter 5, section 5 available on the Department for Transport website at:
http://www2.dft.gov.uk/pgr/roads/tss/tsmanual/trafficsignsmanualchapter5.pdf
gives advice on the appropriate procedure for determining whether they should be installed. The selection criteria are independent of road class.
Cycling
Chris Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what plans he has to promote the cycle to work scheme in (a) Derby North constituency, (b) Derbyshire and (c) the UK. [66792]
Norman Baker: The Department has traditionally promoted both the cycle to work scheme and the cycle to work guarantee to employers, employees and other Government Departments across the country through a number of departmental led promotions and projects. The Department also funds the National Business Travel Network (NBTN). NBTN launched a DFT part funded ‘ways2work’ tool kit in November 2010 to help people and businesses work more efficiently. The tool kit includes a section on encouraging cycling to work.
Most recently the cycle to work Scheme has been promoted through guidance to the members of the Physical Activity Network which is part of the Department for Health led Public Health Responsibility Deal. I have also provided a foreword in support of the Cycle to Work Alliance’s Behavioural Impact Analysis.
Finally, the results of bids for Tranche 1 of the Local Sustainable Transport Fund were released on 5 July 2011, many of which included elements relating to cycling to work.
Electric Vehicles
Mr Bain: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate his Department has made of the number of charging points for electric-powered vehicles in (a) Glasgow, (b) Scotland and (c) the UK to be activated in the next four financial years. [64386]
Norman Baker: The Department received a bid from Transport Scotland for funding under the Plugged-In Places programme on 29 October 2010. This bid was successful with Transport Scotland awarded £1.2 million to install 375 chargepoints by March 2013. There have been a series of programme management conversations with the Transport Scotland project team on the progress of their project but we have received no further representations relating to chargepoints in Scotland.
Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the answer of 7 July 2011, Official Report, columns 1316-7W, on the national planning policy framework, what assessment he has made of the level of promotion by local authorities of the building of electric car charging points. [66390]
Norman Baker: As set out in the Government’s plug-in vehicle infrastructure strategy, “Making the Connection”, published on 30 June 2011, local authorities have an important role in stimulating the provision of infrastructure in their areas. This could be through encouraging infrastructure via planning policies or the provision of public infrastructure.
Local authorities are playing an active role in each of the Plugged-In Places pilot projects, with many others outside the Plugged-In Places areas also installing infrastructure, such as Brighton and Hove city council and Oxford city council. A number of local authorities have also implemented planning policies to encourage the provision of recharging infrastructure in advance of the National Planning Policy Framework, such as in London and Salford.
Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps he plans to take to support the roll-out of rapid chargers for electric vehicles. [66424]
Norman Baker: The Government’s Plugged-In Places pilot projects plan to install around 50 rapid chargers in areas across the UK.
In addition, the Government’s plug-in vehicle infrastructure strategy “Making the Connection”, published on 30 June 2011, set out a range of measures that will support the roll-out of rapid chargers, including Ofgem planning to consult on an exemption for public recharging infrastructure from the Maximum Resale Price rules to help enable a commercial market in the sale of electricity for plug-in vehicles to develop. Should the roll-out of plug-in vehicle infrastructure be constrained by the ability to raise finance, there is the potential for the Green Investment Bank to provide targeted financial solutions for appropriate plug-in vehicle infrastructure projects.
Zac Goldsmith: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps he plans to take to support the roll-out of charging points for electric vehicles at (a) airports, (b) train stations, (c) supermarkets, (d) retail centres and (e) car parks. [66425]
Norman Baker: The Government’s Plugged-In Places pilot projects are planning to install infrastructure in a range of locations, including airports, railway stations, supermarkets, retail centres and car parks, to provide infrastructure for the early plug-in vehicle market in these areas and to provide information on what is required for a national roll-out of infrastructure.
In addition, as set out in ‘Making the Connection: the plug-in vehicle infrastructure strategy’, published on 30 June 2011, the Government are taking a range of steps to support the plug-in vehicle infrastructure market in public places.
This includes establishing a Permitted Development Right that will remove the requirement from owners of publicly accessible car parks to apply for planning permission to install charge points. We are also proposing the inclusion of policy on plug-in vehicle infrastructure in the National Planning Policy Framework, due for consultation soon, which will encourage local authorities to consider adopting policies to include plug-in vehicle recharging infrastructure in all new developments. Ofgem are consulting on an exemption for public recharging infrastructure from the Maximum Resale Price rules to help enable a commercial market in the sale of electricity for plug-in vehicles to develop.
Large Goods Vehicles
Dr Huppert: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what representations his Department has received from the European Commission on the legality of introducing longer lorries. [65963]
Mike Penning: Officials received on 7 July a letter dated 30 June from the Commission. The letter confirmed that Directive 96/53/EC only permits longer semi-trailers if the criteria for one of the exemptions set out in Article 4.4 are fulfilled. The Government’s view, previously communicated to the Commission, is that our proposals for longer semi-trailers fulfil the criteria for exemption in Article 4.4 (b), because their loading length (15.65 metres) can also be achieved by existing rigid/drawbar combinations. The Commission’s letter did not address this point.
Motor Vehicles: Insurance
Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what estimate he has made of the number of uninsured drivers in each of the last three years. [66640]
Mike Penning: We estimate that from a comparison of the Motor Insurance Database operated by the Motor Insurer’s Bureau (MIB) and the DVLA’s vehicles’ database that around 1.4 million vehicles are uninsured. This figure has remained constant for the past three years but is a reduction from an estimated 2 million in 2005.
Motor Vehicles: Testing
Caroline Nokes: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what assessment he has made of the effects on the safety of motorists of changes in the periodicity of MOT tests; [66992]
(2) what estimate he has made of the effects on levels of private sector employment of changes to the periodicity of MOT tests; [66993]
(3) what estimate he has made of the effects on level of fatalities on roads of changes to the periodicity of MOT tests; [66994]
(4) what estimate he has made of the effects on Exchequer revenues of changes to the periodicity of MOT tests. [66995]
Mike Penning: I intend to review the MOT test scheme. I want to make sure that a review takes account of all the latest information available to us. To that end, we have recently published the results of independent research the Department commissioned to examine how vehicle defects affect accident rates, and to consider the potential road safety impact of changing the frequency of the MOT. The ‘Effect of Vehicle Defects in Road Accidents’ report can be found at:
http://www.trl.co.uk/library/reports_publications/latest_publications/
This research will be a useful addition to other information we intend to gather through the review process, including the impacts on garages and private sector employment, and the effect on Exchequer revenues.
Newton Station: Disability
Tom Greatrex: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what assessment he has made of the disabled access to Newton rail station. [66653]
Norman Baker [holding answer 18 July 2011]:In 2009 the Department provided financial support to ATOC to carry out full access audits of every station in Great Britain, including Newton. This was for use with the “Stations Made Easy” application on the National Rail website which now has full details of all access features at stations, including a map and photographs, allowing. disabled passengers to better plan their journey.
Public Transport: Motorcycles
Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport pursuant to the answer of 10 May 2011, Official Report, column 1062W, on invalid vehicles, whether his discussions with representatives of transport operators, manufacturers and user groups are complete; and when he will publish guidance on scooters on public transport. [65589]
Norman Baker: The discussions with transport operators are currently ongoing and guidance will be published when discussions have reached a conclusion.
Department for Transport officials have been working with the Confederation of Passenger Transport (CPT) on the production of CPT’s Code for the use of Mobility Scooters on low floor Buses. This code of practice is due to be published shortly.
Road Signs and Markings
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress has been made on his Department’s review of traffic signs policy. [56025]
Norman Baker: The traffic signs policy review was completed and reported to Ministers in May.
Road Traffic Offences
Mr Iain Wright: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps local authorities are required to take to notify road users of the use of traffic regulation enforcement vehicles; and if he will make a statement. [65789]
Norman Baker: There are no statutory requirements imposed on local authorities regarding the notification to road users of the use of vehicles to which an approved enforcement device has been attached (enforcement vehicles). However, guidance has been issued to local authorities.
The guidance on parking enforcement can be found on the DFT website at:
http://www2.dft.gov.uk/pgr/roads/tpm/tmaportal/tmafeatures/tmapart6/betterprkstatutoryguid.pdf
The provisional guidance for bus lane enforcement can be found on the DFT website at:
http://www2.dft.gov.uk/pgr/regional/buses/gen/coll_provisionalguidanceonbuslan/isionalguidanceonbuslane3570.pdf
Transport
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what discussions his Department has had with the Department for Communities and Local Government on encouraging the uptake of sustainable modes of transport under draft version 4 of the national planning policy framework. [67427]
Norman Baker: My officials have worked closely with the Department for Communities and Local Government to include and promote sustainable transport measures in the national planning policy framework. These will be reflected in the consultation document to be published by the Department for Communities and Local Government.
Travel
Mr Andrew Turner: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) what estimate he has made of the total number of passenger miles travelled by all modes of transport where the journey was (a) up to 10 miles, (b) 10 to 50 miles, (c) 50 to 150 miles and (d) greater than 150 miles for (i) each county in England, (ii) Scotland, (iii) Wales and (iv) Northern Ireland that were made in 2010; [66979]
(2) what information his Department holds on the number of passenger journeys made in (a) Scotland, (b) Wales, (c) Northern Ireland and (d) each county in England in 2010. [66980]
Mrs Villiers [holding answer 18 July 2011]:The National Travel Survey (NTS) covers residents of Great Britain. Data are not available by county as the sample is too small to provide reliable results at that level of geography. Regional level results are available through combining two survey years of data together. The latest results available are for 2008 and 2009 combined. They cover all domestic journeys by all modes of transport, public and private, including walking and cycling.
Table NTS9903 shows the average number of trips per person per year by region and country of residence and can be viewed at the following link:
http://www2.dft.gov.uk/pgr/statistics/datatablespublications/nts/how-mode/nts9903.xls
Table: Average distance travelled per person per year by trip length and region/country: Great Britain, 2008 and 2009 combined
Miles/Number
Trip length (miles)
Region of residence Up to 10 miles 10 to under 50 miles 50 to under 200 miles 200 miles and over Total distance (miles) Unweighted sample (trips)

North East

2,343

2,335

1,142

521

6,341

34,001

North West

2,200

2,343

1,087

470

6,101

85,914

Yorkshire and the Humber

2,260

2,459

1,441

526

6,686

62,625

19 July 2011 : Column 973W

East Midlands

2,194

3,047

1,849

250

7,340

52,946

West Midlands

2,303

2,466

1,503

236

6,509

63,598

East of England

2,152

3,743

1,726

408

8,030

69,008

Greater London

1,973

1,690

969

422

5,054

74,166

South East

2,215

3,147

1,789

522

7,673

100,431

South West

2,300

2,828

2,023

576

7,727

64,536

England

2,197

2,665

1,497

439

6,798

607,225

Wales

2,210

2,959

1,618

251

7,038

34,756

Scotland

2,057

3,096

1,147

932

7,233

58,210

Great Britain

2,186

2,717

1,472

473

6,848

700,191

Note: The specified trip length bandings are not available, and therefore the nearest available bandings have been used instead.
Data for Northern Ireland are collected separately in the Travel Survey for Northern Ireland. Results are available at:
http://www.drdni.gov.uk/index/statistics/stats-catagories/stats-catagories-travel_survey.htm
Railways: Disability
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress his Department has made towards implementing the Technical Specification for Interoperability for Persons of Reduced Mobility on (a) existing and (b) future rail carriages. [67748]
Norman Baker: The Technical Specification for Interoperability for Persons with Reduced Mobility (PRM TSI) is the pan-European accessibility standard that has applied to contracts for new trains of a new design, and major refurbishment of existing trains, signed after 30 June 2008 (or, for orders of new trains to existing designs, since 1 January 2010).
It replaced, for heavy rail, the Rail Vehicle Accessibility Regulations (RVAR)—which are similar domestic access standards that have been in place since 1998.
Over 6,600 vehicles are in service which comply with one of the two access standards. Further details can be found here:
http://assets.dft.gov.uk/publications/transportforyou-access-rail-vehicles-pubs-rva/accessibilitystandards.xls
All future train fleets, such as IEP, Thameslink and Crossrail, will comply with the PRM TSI. Meanwhile, the law requires all rail vehicles to be accessible by 1 January 2020.
Lord Kennedy of Southwark (Labour)
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what research and data collection the Department of Transport has (a) initiated, (b) terminated, and (c) amended, since 12 May 2010.
Earl Attlee (Whip, House of Lords; Conservative)
A list of research and data collection that has been initiated, terminated and/or amended by the Department for Transport since 12 May 2010 is provided in the table below. Further information is available on the department’s research management database at http://www.dft.gov.uk/rmd/.
Research initiated, amended or terminated since 12 May 2010
TitleInitiated (I), amended (A), terminated (T)
Value of Prevented Fatalities and Injuries-Phase 1I
Advanced Biofuels: the potential for a UK industryI
Scenarios for the cost-effective deployment of biofuel in the UK road transport sector in 2020I
Amendments to the UK Renewable Energy Directive Art 19(2) report on emissions from cultivation of biofuels feedstocks in the UKI
Child media consumption researchI
Christmas 2010 THINK! road safety drink drive campaign: post-activity tracking researchI
Annual survey of attitudes to THINK! campaign, road safety and driving behaviourI
Post campaign tracking research for the THINK! road safety ‘Tales of the road’ campaign, for Children aged 6-11I
Evaluation of the ‘Code of Everand’ road safety online game, for children aged 9-12I
Evaluation of THINK! road safety education resources for early years and upper primary childrenI
High Speed 2 Rail Omnibus Survey (Pre consultation)I
Station usage and demand forecasting at newly-opened railway lines and stationsI
Peak spreading fares studyI
Network Modelling Framework Script DevelopmentI
Strategic Fares Model Updating 2I
Responsiveness of rail demandI
Comparing rail forecasting approachesI
Implementing the “revisiting the elasticity-based framework” studyI
Van CO2 Database Matching ProjectI
GB Van CO2 DatabaseI
Freight route choice using GPS dataI
Omnibus survey of public attitudes to bus travelI
Omnibus survey of public attitudes to climate change and travel choicesI
Marginal Abatement Cost Curve ProjectI
Market Maturity and EconometricsI
Aviation Health StudiesI
Train Operating Company Cost ModelA
Emissions ModelA
Evidence Review of the Economics of Shipping and UK PortsA
Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Shipping ServicesA
Value of Travel Time Savings (VTTS) study-Phase 1T
National Transport Model Version 4 Commissioning-Phase 4T
Validation of the NTM using ASHET
Funding of the Transport Research CentreT
Airport Development-Appraisal of Sustainability Scoping DocumentT
Share this Post: Facebook Twitter Google Plus RSS Email

Related Posts

Comments are closed.