PQs 4th – 7th July 2011

Road Vehicle Lighting Regulations 1989
Mr Laurence Robertson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will bring forward legislative proposals to amend the Road Vehicle Lighting Regulations 1989 to allow (a) registered nurses, (b) midwives, (c) ambulance first responders and (d) official first aiders to use flashing lighting when attending urgent medical cases or assisting the police; and if he will make a statement. [63262]
Mike Penning: The Department for Transport has no plans to revise the Road Vehicle Lighting Regulations for flashing lamps.
Allowing the wider use of any restricted lighting function needs to be carefully considered as the warning they provide will become diluted if they are used too often. Ultimately this will be to the disadvantage of those who currently use them.
The lighting Regulations are also subject to the recent ‘Red Tape Challenge’ and comments submitted will be considered.
PACTS comments: The Department for Transport has launched a Red Tape Challenge asking people to comment on Regulations covering road transport. Much of the existing regulatory structure is intended to protect people from unneccessary death or injury. However, it may be the case that some regulations are out of date or could be updated to reflect changing research or circumstances. Comments on specific regulations can be made via the dedicated website. http://bit.ly/fQrSqT
Roads: Accidents
Gareth Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many people have died due to dangerous driving incidents since 2009; and if he will make a statement. [63288]
Mike Penning: The number of deaths in reported road accidents, attributed to a driver convicted of dangerous driving, is not held by the Department for Transport.
However, the Department publishes statistics on reported road accidents in Great Britain, where driver behaviour or inexperience were reported as contributing factors to the accident by the attending police officer. The latest available statistics on fatalities occurring in such accidents can be found in Table 4h (Article 4, pages 58-59) of Reported Road Casualties Great Britain: 2009. A copy has been placed in the Libraries of the House and a link is as follows:
http://www2.dft.gov.uk/adobepdf/162469/221412/221549/227755/rrcgb2009.pdf
Roads: Safety
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what date he has set for the inaugural Road Safety Day; and how much funding he plans to allocate to publicise it. [61270]
Mike Penning: Road Safety Day is still under consideration and no decisions have been made. However, the Department will be considering how best to undertake this with other complementary initiatives next year.
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much he estimates the private sector will contribute to the THINK! road safety advertising campaign over the course of the comprehensive spending review period; and which private sector companies have agreed to provide funding to date. [61271]
Mike Penning: The Department for Transport does not receive cash sponsorship but we do receive ‘in kind’ support from a range of organisations linking with the THINK! road safety campaign. This summer, Britvic is supporting THINK! Driver Friendly activity tackling drink driving and Infinity Motorcycles is supporting the motorcycle safety campaign. We have not finalised plans with other partners.
A233: Road Traffic
Joseph Johnson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will estimate hourly traffic flows in both directions on the A233 in Orpington constituency (a) at peak hours and (b) at other times; and if he will make a statement. [63304]
Mike Penning: The Department for Transport (DFT) produces traffic estimates using data from manual counts, where trained enumerators count traffic on a specific section of the road network over a 12 hour period.
Major roads, such as the A223, are represented by a series of links, which are unique sections of road. It is not possible to count every link every year; therefore the sections of road are surveyed on either an annual basis or on a cycle of every two, four or eight years.
A table providing the latest available 12 hourly data for each section of the A223 in the Orpington constituency has been deposited in the Libraries of the House.
DFT produces an estimate of the average number of vehicles passing a point in the road network on an average day of the given year (AADF).
A table providing the estimated annual average daily flows (AADFs) between 2000 and 2010 for each section of the A223 in the Orpington constituency has been deposited in the Libraries of the House. These data are not available by hourly breakdown.
A map showing the location of the three count points on the A223 in the Orpington constituency has also been deposited in the Libraries of the House.
Aviation
Mr Donohoe: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport for what reason a national policy statement for aviation has not been produced. [64214]
Mrs Villiers: The Government have made clear their position on additional runways at London’s three major airports and that their priority is therefore to create a sustainable framework for UK aviation, rather than produce a national policy statement for airports. This was set out in ‘Major infrastructure planning reform: Work plan’, published by the Department for Communities and Local Government in December 2010.
The Government issued a scoping document in March 2011 to inform the development of a sustainable framework for UK aviation which will be published for consultation in March 2012.
Caroline Lucas: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what near-miss incidents involving (a) commercial and (b) private aircraft and UK nuclear installations have been reported to his Department in each year since May 2004; and if he will place copies of the report on each incident in the Library. [64469]
Mrs Villiers: The Air Accident Investigation Branch has not been notified of any near-miss incidents involving either commercial or private aircraft and UK nuclear installations since May 2004.
Bus Services: Finance
Andrew Gwynne: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he plans any further changes to the Bus Service Operators Grant between 2012 and 2015. [58767]
Norman Baker: In its business plan, the Department for Transport has committed to review the future distribution of Bus Service Operators Grant by March 2012. The Department is working with bus operators and local government to look at smarter ways of delivering bus subsidy, and is keen to see what can be developed by consensus between local authorities and operators. An announcement will be made in due course.
Driving Instruction
Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the fee levels are for driver awareness courses in the six highest charging authorities; and what assessment he has made of the compliance of such fees with the requirement to charge on a non-profit basis. [63698]
Mike Penning: The Department for Transport does not hold information concerning fee levels for driver awareness courses in the six highest charging authorities or the level of fees in relation to costs. Driver awareness courses are organised by local police forces and it would be for them to respond on this. The Department strongly supports a national framework and has been keen to encourage all police forces to participate in this, which allows motorists to take courses in their local area and should also provide greater consistency of course fees.
Driving: Licensing
Nick de Bois: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether provisions are in place to prevent the purchasing of motor insurance by an individual who does not have a valid immigration status in (a) England, (b) Wales, (c) Scotland and (d) Northern Ireland. [60836]
Mike Penning: There is no statutory requirement on motor insurers to check the immigration status of someone seeking to insure a vehicle. Insurers underwrite the risk of those they insure and there is a statutory requirement on an insurer to meet the liability where the insured has been found at fault in an accident.
EC Regulation 137/2007/EC
Tony Lloyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what consideration he has given to the implementation of EC Regulation 137/2007/EC on rail passengers’ rights and obligations. [63349]
Norman Baker: Following consultation with the rail industry and passenger groups, the Government decided to maintain the decision taken in 2009 by the previous Administration to exempt domestic services from the non-core elements of the Rail Passengers’ Rights and Obligations Regulation for a period of five years up to December 2014. We believe that the marginal benefits of fully extending the pan-European regime to domestic passengers would be outweighed by the costs to Government and industry. It would also conflict with our intention to reduce regulatory burdens and with our franchise reform agenda. The UK already has a well-established regime for protecting the rights of domestic rail passengers, including by providing assistance to persons with reduced mobility and disabilities, protecting passengers in case of delay and ensuring a convenient handling of their claims in case of an accident.
Great Western Railway Line: Railway Signals
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport when he expects the proposed re-signalling of the Great Western Main Line with the European train control system to (a) begin and (b) be completed. [61262]
Mrs Villiers: Network rail are responsible for delivering the UK’s rollout of the European Rail Traffic Management System (ERTMS).
ERTMS rollout on the Great Western main line from Paddington to Bristol is expected to commence in March 2016 and be completed by early 2018. These dates are subject to confirmation by Network Rail following detailed planning.
Level Crossings: Safety
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will review the procedures followed by (a) the Office of Rail Regulation and (b) Network Rail in implementing the safety recommendations arising from the fatalities at Elsenham level crossing in 2005. [61287]
Mrs Villiers: There are no plans to review the operational procedures followed by the independent rail safety regulator. With regard to Network Rail’s implementation, it is a role of the Office of Rail Regulation to ensure that rail Accident Investigation Branch safety recommendations are duly taken into consideration, and where appropriate acted upon.
The Office of Rail Regulation re-opened the investigation into the accident in early 2011.
Motorcycles: Safety
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how much his Department plans to spend on campaigns to increase road safety for motorcyclists in each year of the comprehensive spending review period. [62379]
Mike Penning: The spending review allocated £3.5 million for THINK! road safety communications in each year of the review period. Motorcycle safety remains a priority, however all communications are subject to the controls on advertising and marketing spend governed by the Efficiency and Reform Group (ERG). In 2011-12, ERG has approved expenditure of £1.12 million on the THINK! Motorcycle safety campaign. Plans for the rest of the spending review period have yet to be submitted and approved.
Railways: Disability
Tony Lloyd: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what discussions he has had with passenger rail franchise holders on steps to be taken to meet the needs of passengers with disabilities. [63264]
Norman Baker: The Government are committed to an accessible rail system in which disabled passengers have the same opportunities to travel as other members of society, and rail franchise holders are fundamental to delivering that commitment. The Department for Transport is involved in an ongoing dialogue with the industry concerning the current situation and what further improvements may be made.
Franchise holders already have a number of specific legal obligations in relation to disabled passengers, including a requirement to produce a Disabled People’s Protection Policy which states how they will protect the interests of disabled users of their trains and stations. The Department reviews and approves these documents on an annual basis.
Railways: Standards
Mark Menzies: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what steps his Department is taking to increase the frequency of rail services in less populated areas. [63352]
Mrs Villiers: The Department’s Community Rail Development Strategy, which seeks to make it easier for the rail industry and local communities to do more to ensure the long term health of local services, has aided innovative solutions which have led to increased rail services in some less populated areas. Local authorities are free to use funds allocated to them from the Government to enhance passenger facilities on rural lines and can fund additional services if they feel this is appropriate.
Speed Limits
Nadine Dorries: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport if he will bring forward proposals to increase the level of support offered to rural communities wishing to lower speed limits on roads in their area. [61882]
Mike Penning: Local highway authorities already have control of local speed limits, and should take full account of local communities’ views in setting these limits. A key theme in the Government’s Strategic Framework for Road Safety published in May 2011 is the empowerment of local communities, including enabling the public to compare road safety performance in their local area with other similar areas. This will help communities to challenge local service providers on issues such as speed limits. Decisions on speed limits should be based upon comprehensive analysis of all the costs and benefits. The Department is intending to help local decision making through further guidance and an economic toolkit on speed limits.
Departmental Regulation
Gordon Banks: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what regulations his Department introduced between 1 March 2011 and 31 May 2011; and what the estimated costs of implementation were for those affected in each case. [60326]
Norman Baker: Between 1 March 2011 and 31 May 2011 the Department for Transport made the statutory instruments listed in the following table.
Costs and benefits, concluding with a net benefit figure, have been provided only for those measures where an impact assessment has been produced. They are total figures (transitional and annual average).
Not included in the table are temporary and local instruments, 157 of which were made by the Department in March, 64 in April and 135 in May. Of these, 324 were temporary local highways orders, 29 were temporary local flying orders, two were local highways orders and one was a local railway order. Further information about these temporary and local orders could be provided only at disproportionate cost.
Title SI Number Date of making Estimated costs and benefits of implementation (as reported in the impact assessments)

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency Trading Fund (Revocation) Order 2011

630

2 March 2011

An impact assessment has not been produced for this instrument as no impact on the business or voluntary sectors or on citizens is foreseen.

The Air Navigation(Dangerous Goods) (Amendment) Regulations 2011

650

3 March 2011

No cost data available. No impact assessment produced for this measure.

The Aerodromes(Designation) (Detention and Sale of Aircraft) (England and Wales) (Amendment) Order 2011

832

16 March 2011

An impact assessment has not been prepared for this instrument as there are no costs or benefits to business.

The Airport Byelaws (Designation) Order 2011

828

16 March 2011

An impact assessment has not been produced for this instrument as it has no impact on the costs of business.

The M1 Motorway (Junctions 25 to 28) (Variable Speed Limits) Regulations 2011

909

23 March 2011

Total costs £24.1 million. Total benefits £50.8 million. Total net benefit £26.7 million (2002 price base, 2008 present value, 30 years appraisal period).

The Road Traffic Exemptions (Special Forces) (Variation and Amendment) Regulations 2011

935

23 March 2011

An impact assessment has not been produced for this instrument as no impact on the private or voluntary sectors is foreseen.

The Merchant Shipping (Ship-to-Ship Transfers) (Amendment) Regulations 2011

974

28 March 2011

An impact assessment of the effect of these Regulations has not been prepared as they do not themselves have any impact on the cost of business.

The Road Vehicles(Powers to Stop) Regulations 2011

996

29 March 2011

Total costs £0.59 million. Total benefits £2.88 million. Total net benefit £2.30 million (2010 present value, 2010 price base, 10 years appraisal).

The M1 Motorway (Junctions 6A to 10) (Variable Speed Limits) Regulations 2011

1015

30 March 2011

Total costs £13.8 million. Total benefits £53.6 million. Total net benefit £39.8 million. (2008 prices, 2008 present value, 30 years appraisal period).

The Traffic Signs (Amendment) Regulations and General Directions 2011

1040

30 March 2011

The impact assessment does not present any monetised costs or benefits.

The Road Safety Act 2006 (Commencement No.7) Order 2011

1119

12 April 2011

See entry below.

The Motor Vehicles (Insurance Requirements) (Immobilisation, Removal And Disposal) Regulations 2011

1120

12 April 2011

Total costs £78 million. Total benefits £380 million. Total net benefits £302 million. (2010 present value, 2010 price base, nine years appraisal period). These costs and benefits cover both the Road Safety Act 2006 (Commencement No. 7) Order 2011 and the Motor Vehicles (Insurance Requirements) (Immobilisation, Removal And Disposal) Regulations 2011. Since the implementation of the measure the total transition costs have been £8.47 million and the annual recurring costs have been revised to £4.4 million over nine years.

The Mandatory Travel Concession (England) Regulations 2011

1121

13 April 2011

Total costs £0.03 million. Total benefits £0.68 million. Total net benefits £0.65 million. (2010 present value and 2010 base price, 10 years appraisal period).

The Tractor etc (EC Type-Approval) (Amendment) Regulations 2011

1279

16 May 2011

A full impact assessment has not been prepared for this instrument as it has no impact on the costs of business or the voluntary sector.

The Disabled Persons (Badges for Motor Vehicles) (England) (Amendment) Regulations 2011

1307

23 May 2011

Total costs £2.74 million. Total benefits £2.57 million. Total net benefits—£0.17 million (2010 present value and 2010 base price, 10 years appraisal period).

The Yarmouth (Isle of Wight) Harbour Revision Order 2011

1347

26 May 2011

A full regulatory assessment has not been produced for this instrument as no significant impact on the private or voluntary sectors is foreseen.

Large Goods Vehicles
Maria Eagle: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many heavy goods vehicles in each weight category are recorded on the most recent vehicle registration database. [62381]
Mike Penning: The following table gives the number of heavy goods vehicles registered in Great Britain that were either licensed or with a Statutory Off Road Notification (SORN) as at 31 March 2011.
Gross weight (tonnes) Licensed With a SORN Total

3.5t to under 7.5t

88,477

18,508

106,985

7.5t to under 17t

131,974

16,628

148,602

17t to under 25t

65,715

7,402

73,117

25t to under 33t

76,632

6,916

83,548

33t or greater

105,196

10,857

116,053

Total

467,994

60,311

528,305

These figures will differ slightly to statistics produced by the Department on road freight. This is because there are some vehicles registered as heavy goods vehicles that do not carry freight, including, for instance, cranes, cement mixers and some vehicles used in the building trade. These vehicles are excluded from the road freight surveys.
Motor Vehicles: Insurance
Mr Brine: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what information his Department holds on the number of uninsured drivers in Winchester constituency. [63409]
Mike Penning: The Department for Transport does not hold any information on the number of uninsured drivers in the Winchester constituency.
The estimated number of uninsured vehicles in Great Britain is 1.4 million (4% of vehicles).
Mr Brine: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he has considered the merits of introducing a requirement of a mandatory insurance disc for motor vehicles. [63410]
Mike Penning: The merits of an insurance windscreen disc have been considered. However, it would only show that the vehicle was insured at the point the disc was issued and not prove that it was continuously insured.
The continuous insurance enforcement scheme introduced in June allows us to identify uninsured vehicles by comparing existing information held on record, and take action, without relying on spotting the vehicle on the road.
Motor Vehicles: Testing
Mr Brine: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport whether he has any plans to bring forward proposals to review the MOT test scheme. [63414]
Mike Penning: I refer my hon. Friend to my answer of 17 May 2011, Official Report, column 141W, to the hon. Member for Poplar and Limehouse (Jim Fitzpatrick).
Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what the failure rate was for candidates taking the driving test for the first time in each driving test centre in the latest period for which figures are available. [63434]
Mike Penning: A table providing information on the failure rates for candidates taking the driving test for the first time, in each driving test centre, in the financial year 2010-11 has been placed in the Libraries of the House.
 
Motorways: Death
Stephen Mosley: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport (1) how many deaths have occurred on motorways in each year since 1981; [63778]
(2) what the causes were of fatal automobile accidents on motorways in each of the last five years for which figures are available. [63820]
Mike Penning: The number of fatalities as a result of reported personal injury road accidents on motorways in Great Britain since 1981 is shown on Table 1.
The time series on road accident fatalities since 1981 may not be a true like-for-like comparison due to growth in motorway length and associated growth in traffic. The motorway length in Great Britain increased from 2,647 km in 1981 to 3,560 km in 2010.
It is not possible to identify the cause of road accidents from data collected through STATS19. However, the Department for Transport collects statistics on contributory factors in accidents reported by the attending police officer. The reported contributory factors for fatal road accidents on motorways in Great Britain for 2005 to 2009 are shown on Table 2.
Table 1: Reported fatalities in personal injury accidents on motorways (1) —GB—1981-2010

Number of fatalities

1981 223

1982 206

1983

187

1984

211

1985

241

1986

248

1967

283

1988

242

1989

233

1990

229

1991

234

1992

238

2993

201

1994

157

1995

180

1996

165

1997

191

1998

174

1999

202

2000

189

2001

203

2002

224

2003

217

2004

164

2005

204

2006

187

2007

183

2008

158

2009

132

2010

118

Table 2: Contributory factors—Reported fatal road accidents (1) on motorways (2) —GB 2005-09
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009
Contributory factors reported (3) in fatal accidents on motorways Number %(4) Number %(4) Number %(4) Number %(4) Number %(4)

Loss of control

57

37

62

41

42

30

45

36

38

37

Fatigue

24

15

24

16

20

14

17

14

19

18

Travelling too fast for conditions

23

15

19

13

13

9

11

9

11

11

Exceeding speed limit

22

14

14

9

11

8

7

6

9

9

Failed to look properly

21

13

14

9

17

12

17

14

14

14

Failed to judge other person’s path or speed

18

12

19

13

24

17

20

16

10

10

Poor turn or manoeuvre

18

12

13

9

6

4

5

4

7

7

Careless, reckless or in a hurry

16

10

12

8

12

9

13

10

10

10

Swerved

15

10

16

11

16

11

15

12

8

8

Impaired by alcohol

14

9

12

8

7

5

9

7

10

10

Other

12

8

13

9

11

8

8

6

12

12

Dangerous action in carriageway (eg, playing) by pedestrians

9

6

6

4

11

8

7

6

6

6

Following too close

9

6

12

8

6

4

3

2

6

6

Slippery road (due to weather)

7.

4

7

5

6

4

6

5

9

9

Illness or disability, mental or physical

5

3

8

5

13

9

6

5

10

10

Total number of accidents

156

100

152

100

140

100

125

100

103

100

 (1) Includes only accidents where a police officer attended the scene and in which a contributory factor was reported. (2) Includes motorway and A(M) roads. (3) Includes only the ten most frequently reported contributory factors for each year. Factors not shown may also have been reported. (4) Columns may not add up to 100% as accidents can have more than one contributory factor.
Roads: Repairs and Maintenance
Chris Williamson: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what progress has been made on the report commissioned by his Department into potential sources of risk to strategic transport networks from activities below roads and railways and on adjacent sites. [63296]
Mike Penning: The recommendations within the reports compiled by both the Highways Agency and Network Rail are currently being considered by the Secretary of State for Transport, my right hon. Friend the Member for Runnymede and Weybridge (Mr Hammond).
Pedestrian Crossings: Greater London
Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many school crossing patrol officers were employed in each London borough in each year since 1988. [64177]
Mike Penning: The Department for Transport does not hold figures for the numbers of school crossing patrol officers employed in each London borough in each year. The employment of school crossing patrol officers is a matter for local authorities.
Roads: Accidents
Sadiq Khan: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many road traffic accidents involving children there have been in each London borough in each year since 1988. [64178]
Mike Penning: The number of reported personal injury road accidents involving children (aged 0 to 15 years) in each London borough in each year since 1988 is shown in Tables 1 and 2.

Table 1: Number of reported personal injury road accidents involving children (1) , Greater London: 1988-99
Number of reported personal injury accidents
London borough 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

City of London

6

16

9

8

11

7

3

7

4

8

12

4

Barking and Dagenham

189

176

201

160

162

131

149

145

153

162

158

138

Barnet

211

196

221

202

202

207

215

196

183

168

183

184

Bexley

151

137

161

138

137

134

112

135

148

120

120

134

Brent

233

227

220

227

211

192

180

178

172

191

175

171

Bromley

193

202

188

177

154

146

185

155

163

196

182

153

Camden

150

130

121

114

126

107

103

112

101

96

104

81

Croydon

229

237

233

239

238

243

284

245

227

221

228

258

Ealing

208

260

236

202

208

173

191

175

187

176

180

210

Enfield

195

195

184

188

207

205

214

192

199

193

181

212

Greenwich

224

253

256

213

223

164

203

219

174

174

181

188

Hackney

195

218

223

175

169

190

188

165

173

182

160

163

Hammersmith and Fulham

106

114

108

102

100

79

99

83

83

107

76

83

Haringey

161

179

164

162

157

157

139

159

136

156

153

120

Harrow

124

119

109

102

108

92

104

110

104

94

90

90

Havering

224

229

221

176

187

156

141

172

156

158

161

129

Hillingdon

182

223

197

194

188

204

170

200

152

173

152

142

Hounslow

195

197

211

174

159

174

166

146

160

. 175

160

134

Islington

127

158

153

143

136

113

98

101

104

105

108

120

Kensington and Chelsea

87

68

72

66

72

73

60

66

50

49

67

49

Kingston upon Thames

118

117

106

90

87

84

81

76

65

71

75

51

Lambeth

255

261

260

249

244

231

235

249

203

204

204

205

Lewisham

233

229

207

217

219

227

220

189

191

217

195

206

Merton

95

115

145

81

103

97

95

95

125

99

98

99

Newham

227

264

334

242

230

260

229

214

228

233

208

225

Redbridge

147

174

162

161

152

144

162

170

162

134

148

171

Richmond upon Thames

87

102

91

90

68

84

94

82

76

67

74

58

Southwark

239

239

268

217

209

224

208

199

153

191

182

186

Sutton

112

139

137

136

124

107

114

106

98

97

106

91

Tower Hamlets

178

191

185

169

162

144

138

143

128

108

128

118

Waltham Forest

186

196

192

183

199

162

138

162

156

151

166

151

Wandsworth

193

188

172

174

153

146

171

150

163

135

137

138

Westminster

157

161

160

153

131

142

113

112

127

121

124

115

Heathrow airport

0

4

0

4

5

4

3

2

6

3

1

3

Greater London(2)

5,617

5,914

5,907

5,328

5,241

5,003

5,005

4,910

4,710

4,735

4,677

4,580

Fixed Penalties
Mr Slaughter: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans she has for the future range of offences for which a (a) fixed penalty notice and (b) penalty notice for disorder may be issued; and if she will make a statement. [61399]
Nick Herbert: A fixed penalty notice can be issued for any offence in respect of a vehicle that has been made a fixed penalty offence by order of the Secretary of State for the Home Department. Fixed penalty offences are kept under continuous review and additions are made as appropriate. The Government’s new Strategic Framework for Road Safety issued in May proposed that the offence of careless driving should be made a fixed penalty offence. Subject to impact assessment and regulatory clearance, we expect this to come into effect in 2012.
The offences for which a PND can be issued are likewise kept under review. As set out in the Green Paper “Breaking the Cycle: Effective punishment, rehabilitation and sentencing of offenders”, the Ministry of Justice will be consulting on a limited further extension of the PND scheme. The proposed additional offences will include minor disorder offences committed in Royal Parks for which PNDs are currently not available, as well as other low-level disorder offences that may be appropriate to be dealt with by a PND.
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