PQs 11th – 14th February

Education
 
Roads: Safety
 
Andrew Rosindell: To ask the Secretary of State for Education what steps he is taking to educate children about proper road safety. [142387]
Elizabeth Truss: Road safety education can be covered as part of non-statutory personal, social, health and economic (PSHE) education. Schools are free to decide what to include in their PSHE programmes and should tailor the content of PSHE lessons to take account of the needs of their pupils.
Business of the House
 
Jim Fitzpatrick (Poplar and Limehouse) (Lab): Targets to reduce the number of people being killed and seriously injured on our roads served the country very well for over 30 years. In 2010, the then Transport Secretary abolished targets. The new Secretary of State has introduced forecasts. May we have a debate on road safety in general, in which we might clarify the difference between targets and forecasts—or, indeed, if there is any difference at all?
Mr Lansley: The hon. Gentleman is very knowledgeable about these matters, and I will ask my colleagues at the Department for Transport to respond to his question. What I will say, however, is that we are looking for outcomes, and what really matters is finding the mechanisms that enable us to improve road safety.
Home
 
Dangerous Driving
 
Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department (1) how many people have been given multiple custodial sentences for dangerous driving while (a) under the influence of alcohol and (b) not under the influence of alcohol since 2000; [139816]
(2) how many people with a previous conviction for dangerous driving while (a) under the influence of alcohol and (b) not under the influence of alcohol have been later charged with dangerous driving while (i) under the influence and (ii) not under the influence of alcohol in each of the last 10 years; [139818]
(3) how many people who have previously served a custodial sentence for dangerous driving while (a) under the influence of alcohol and (b) not under the influence of alcohol have been charged for the same offence within 10 years in each of the last 10 years. [139820]
Jeremy Wright: I have been asked to reply on behalf of the Ministry of Justice.
PQ 139816
(a) 1,872 offenders have been given multiple custodial sentences for dangerous driving while under the influence of alcohol since 2000.
(b) 2,870 offenders have been given multiple custodial sentences for dangerous driving while not under the influence of alcohol since 2000
PO 139818
Table 1A shows the number of offenders with a previous conviction for dangerous driving under the influence of alcohol who have been later convicted for dangerous driving while under the influence of alcohol and not under the influence of alcohol in each year, 12 months ending June 2002 to 12 months ending June 2012, England and Wales.
Table 1A : Number of offenders with a previous conviction for dangerous driving under the influence of alcohol who have been later convicted for dangerous driving while under the influence of alcohol and not under the influence of alcohol in each year, 12 months ending June 2002 to 12 months ending June 2012, England and Wales
12 months ending June Under the influence of alcohol Not under the influence of alcohol

2002

12,211

1,314

2003

14,472

1,560

2004

15,964

1,598

2005

16,647

1,516

2006

16,755

1,410

2007

16,864

1,443

2008

16,923

1,364

2009

15,646

1,238

2010

14,425

1,152

2011

13,036

1,024

2012

12,871

1,045

Source: Ministry of Justice
Table 1B shows the number of offenders with a previous conviction for dangerous driving ‘not’ under the influence of alcohol who have been later convicted for dangerous driving while under the influence of alcohol and not under the influence of alcohol in each year, 12 months ending June 2002 to 12 months ending June 2012, England and Wales.
Table 1B: Number of offenders with a previous conviction for dangerous driving not under the influence of alcohol who have been later convicted for dangerous driving while under the influence and not under the influence in each year, 12 months ending June 2002 to 12 months ending June 2012, England and Wales, England and Wales
12 months ending June Under the influence of alcohol Not under the influence of alcohol

2002

2,745

1,791

2003

3,111

1,970

2004

3,289

1,934

2005

3,199

1,778

2006

3,193

1,559

2007

3,014

1,551

2008

2,986

1,442

2009

2,715

1,257

2010

2,625

1,049

2011

2,331

959

2012

                       2,326

                             1,035

Source: Ministry of Justice
Table 2: Number of offenders who previously served a custodial sentence for dangerous driving while under the influence of alcohol and not under the influence of alcohol who have been charged for the same offence in each year, 12 months ending June 2002 to 12 months ending June 2012, England and Wales.

Table 2: Number of offenders who previously served a custodial sentence for dangerous driving while under the influence of alcohol and not under the influence of alcohol who have been charged for the same offence in each year, 12 months ending June 2002 to 12 months ending June 2012, England and Wales.
12 months ending June Under the influence of alcohol Not under the influence of alcohol

2002

2,657

1,252

2003

3,067

1,408

2004

3,130

1,432

2005

3,077

1,271

2006

2,854

1,122

2007

2,548

1,060

2008

2,411

983

2009

2,138

835

2010

1,910

719

2011

1,709

622

2012

1,599

685

Source: Ministry of Justice
The Police National Computer (PNC) came into existence in 2000 and information prior to this is not considered reliable so data before July 2001 is not available. The figures have been drawn from the police’s administrative IT system, (PNC) which, as with any large scale recording system, is subject to possible errors with data entry and processing. The figures are provisional and subject to change as more information is recorded by the police.
Drink driving offences presented in the tables include the following offences:
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec. 1(1). As amended by the Road Traffic Act 1991 S.l and CJA 1993 S.67 Causing death by dangerous driving.
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sect 3A as added by the RTA 1991 S.3 and amended by CJA 1993 S.67. Causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs
Causing death by careless or inconsiderate driving; Road Traffic Act 1988 S.2B as added by Road Safety Act S20
Causing death by driving: unlicensed, disqualified or uninsured drivers; Road Traffic Act 1988 S.3ZB as added by Road Safety Act S.21
Road Traffic Act 1988.S.22A as added to by the Road Traffic Act 1991 Sec 6 Causing danger by causing anything to be on a road, interfering with a vehicle or traffic equipment.
Offences against the Person Act 1861 Sec. 35 Causing bodily harm by furious driving
Theft Act 1968 S.12A as added by the Aggravated Vehicle Taking Act 1992 S. 1 – Aggravated taking where owing to the driving of the vehicle an accident occurs causing the death of any person
7 Feb 2013 : Column 394W
Theft act 1968 s. 12a – aggravated taking where : a) the vehicle was driven dangerously on a road or other public place, or b) owing to the driving of the vehicle an accident occurred causing injury to any person or damage to any property other than the v
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec.2 As amended by the Road Traffic Act 1991. Dangerous Driving.
Driving or attempting to drive after consuming alcohol or drugs
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec. 4(1) Driving or attempting to drive a mechanically propelled vehicle while unfit through drink or drugs (impairment).
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec.5 (1) (a) Driving or attempting to drive a mechanically propelled vehicle while having a breath, blood or urine alcohol concentration in excess of the prescribed limit.
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec. 7(6) Driving or attempting to drive a mechanically propelled vehicle and failing without reasonable excuse to provide a specimen for a laboratory test or two specimens for analysis of breath.
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec. 4(2) In charge of a mechanically propelled vehicle while unfit through drink or drugs (impairment).
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec. 5(1) ( b ) In charge of a mechanically propelled vehicle while having a breath, blood or urine alcohol concentration in excess of the prescribed limit,
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec. 7(6) In charge of a mechanically propelled vehicle and failing without reasonable excuse to provide a for a specimen for a laboratory test or two specimens for analysis of breath.
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec. 6(4) Failing without reasonable excuse to provide a specimen of breath for a preliminary test.
Failing to allow specimen of blood to be subjected to laboratory test. Road Traffic Act 1998
Driving or attempting to drive a motor vehicle whilst unfit through drink or drugs (impairment) – drink. Road Traffic Act 1988 S.4(2)
Driving or attempting to drive a motor vehicle whilst unfit through drink or drugs (impairment) – drugs. Road Traffic Act 1988 S.4(l)
Being in charge of a mechanically propelled vehicle whilst unfit to drive through drink or drugs, (impairment) – drink. Road Traffic Act 1988 S.4(2)
Being in charge of a mechanically propelled vehicle whilst unfit to drive through drink or drugs (impairment) – drugs. Road Traffic Act 1988 S.4(2)
Careless Driving (Non Standard List)
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec. 3 Careless driving – without due care and attention.
Failure to comply with an order to stop a moving vehicle, Police Reform Act 2002.
Use of hand held mobile phone while driving. Road Vehicles Regulations 1986.
Causing the use of a mobile phone while driving a motor vehicle. Road Vehicles Regulations 1986.
Using a mobile phone while supervising the holder of a provisional driving licence to drive a motor vehicle on the road. Road Vehicles Regulations 1986
Road Traffic Act 1988 Sec. 12(1) Racing on highway.
Transport
Driving Under Influence: Drugs
 
Jim Dobbin: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport which external stakeholders the Government’s recently established expert panel on drug driving has (a) had meetings with and (b) received information from; and if he will make a statement. [142747]
Stephen Hammond: The following list details those organisations that the expert panel made reference to or held conversations with:
The International Council on Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety
The Driving Vehicle and Licensing Agency (DVLA)
The Royal College of General Practitioners
Clockwork Research Ltd
Napp Pharmaceutical Group
British Pain Society
Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs
The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency
In addition, teleconferences or meetings were held with experts from the University of Groningen, University of Ghent, University of Surrey and Kings College London. The panel also made use of published research papers, articles and guidelines already in the public domain. We will be publishing the panel’s report shortly.
Motorways
 
Meg Munn: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what representations he has received on removing the hard shoulder of motorways to create an extra lane. [142477]
Stephen Hammond: The Highways Agency has received a number of representations from local highways authorities, emergency services and other affected parties in relation to managed motorway schemes planned for the M25, M1, M3, M6, M60 and M62.
In all cases the Agency continues to have active and productive dialogue with all interested parties.
In South and West Yorkshire emergency responders and the Agency are setting up a group to agree the operational procedures for these schemes.
Large Goods Vehicles
 
Nic Dakin: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what research his Department has commissioned on the relationship between (a) HGV density of traffic flows, (b) speed of those traffic flows and (c) accident levels. [143215]
Stephen Hammond: The Department commissioned an evaluation of a potential increase in the speed limit of heavy goods vehicles (over 7.5 tonnes) on single carriageway roads, from the current limit of 40 mph.
The report was published in November 2012 and is available at
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/heavy-goods-vehicle-speed-limit-increase-evaluation-final-report
Motorways
 
Meg Munn: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what information his Department holds on research into the potential effect on road safety of the replacement of motorway hard shoulders by refuges; and whether he has made an assessment of such research. [142557]
Stephen Hammond: The Highways Agency has completed an assessment of the safety risk for the managed motorways layout all lane running, which includes the permanent conversion of the hard shoulder to a running lane and the inclusion of refuge areas.
This assessment showed a 15% reduction in safety risk when compared to a dual three lane motorway with hard shoulder. This assessment is contained in the Highways Agency’s report ‘Managed Motorways All Lanes Running—Demonstration of Meeting Safety Objective Report’ that is available on the agency website and I have also placed a copy in the Libraries of the House.
The safety risk analysis of all lanes running has learnt from the three year safety performance of the active traffic management operation of dynamic hard shoulder running between junctions 3A and 7 of the M42. An assessment of this performance showed that the average number of personal injury accidents reduced from 5.08 per month before the implementation of active traffic management to 2.25 per month following the introduction of hard shoulder running. This represents a 55.7% reduction in accidents.
Speed Limits: Traffic Lights
 
Annette Brooke: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what recent representations he has received on the use of speed control traffic lights which are activated to turn red by drivers going over the speed limit; and if he will make a statement. [143200]
Norman Baker: There have been no recent requests to use traffic lights to control speed by turning red when an approaching driver goes over the speed limit.
Rather than turning lights red to control speed, we advocate the use of ‘green waves’ – programming the signals across a network to turn green if traffic approaches at a given speed. As well as controlling speed, this can improve traffic flow and reduce delays.
Driving Offences: Mobile Phones
 
Richard Burden: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport how many road accidents involving drivers using mobile phones have been recorded in each of the last five years. [142664]
Stephen Hammond: The numbers of personal injury road accidents in Great Britain where the police officer attending the scene of the accident reported “Driver using mobile phone” as a contributory factor for last five years is:
Number of accidents

2007

348

2008

323

2009

325

2010

349

2011

374

From 1 January 2005, information on contributory factors to road accidents has been collected by a police officer at the scene of the accident. A police officer may choose between one and six different factors that they felt contributed to the accident. Not all reported road accidents are included in the contributory factor analysis, only those where a police officer attended the scene and at least one contributory factor was reported.
The contributory factors reflect the reporting officer’s opinion at the time of reporting and are not necessarily the result of extensive investigation. Moreover it is recognised that subsequent inquiries could lead to the reporting officer changing their opinion. It is important to note where some factors may have contributed to the cause of an accident it may be difficult for a police officer attending the scene after the accident has occurred to identify these factors.
Driving Tests
 
Chris Ruane: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport what information is held on (a) the number of drivers who pass their driving test first time, (b) the gender of and (c) the age group of driving test applicants. [142468]
Stephen Hammond: The Driving Standards Agency publishes driving test data at:
https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-for-transport/series/driving-tests-and-instructors-statistics
The number of drivers who passed their car practical driving test at the first attempt over the last two financial years is shown in the following table.
Number

2010-11

336,356

2011-12

332,700

The breakdown of car practical driving test applicants by gender and age group for financial year 2010-11 and 2011-12 is shown in the following tables.
Male
2010-11 2011-12

17

204,831

187,514

18

105,793

95,879

19

57,802

53,797

20

39,334

38,136

21-25

144,338

141,201

26-30

108,855

105,520

31+

152,537

153,605

Total

813,490

775,652

Female
2010-11 2011-12

17

185,992

179,283

18

118,488

107,332

19

67,677

62,966

20

45,865

45,575

21-25

166,092

161,509

26-30

119,731

117,033

31+

182,663

187,280

Total

886,508

860,978 

House of Lords
Roads: Fatalities
Question
Asked by Lord Trefgarne
 
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether the Air Accident Investigation Branch continues to require closure of the roads around the site of the recent helicopter crash in Vauxhall; when they expect the roads to be re-opened; and why they were not opened as expected on 4 February.[HL5287]
Earl Attlee: The Air Accidents Investigation Branch is no longer on site and do not require any road closures at Vauxhall as all the helicopter debris has now been recovered.
With the exception of trunk roads, under devolution roads in London are the responsibility of the local highway authority, either Transport for London (TfL) or the relevant London Borough.
However, TfL has advised that repairing a crane of this size and nature is a slow and intricate process and that severe weather can have a significant effect on progress. Due to recent high winds, some of which have reached in excess of 35 kilometres per hour, and heavy fog around the Vauxhall area, Brookfield Multiplex’s work to repair the 190-metre crane on St Georges Tower took longer than originally planned but was completed on 10 February 2013.
Roads: Speed Limits
 
Question
Asked by Lord Taylor of Warwick
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the impact of 20 miles per hour speed limits on the safety of children, and what advice they give to local authorities on that subject. [HL5340]
Earl Attlee: In 1996 the Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) published a report for the Department for Transport on 20 mph zones. The report showed that accidents fell by 60% and accidents to children fell by 67% where these zones had been introduced. (Review of Traffic Calming Schemes in 20mph Zones, TRL report 215)
The department has also researched the effects of the introduction of widespread 20 mph limits in Portsmouth and has published some preliminary findings. These can be found at: http://assets.dft.gov.uk/publications/speed-limits-portsmouth/speed-limits-portsmouth.pdf.
The interim report (Atkins, published 2009) found a 22% reduction in casualties (at all ages) where the national trend was a fall of 14%.
On 18 January 2012 the department published Setting Local Speed Limits (DfT Circular 01/2013), which revises guidance to local councils, which will help them implement more consistent speed limits on local roads. It incorporates recent changes that create more flexibility for authorities to implement 20 mph limits and zones. It says that traffic authorities can, over time, introduce 20 mph speed limits or zones on major streets where there are-or could be-significant numbers of journeys on foot, and/or where pedal cycle movements are an important consideration, and this outweighs the disadvantage of longer journey times for motorised traffic. This is in addition to encouraging 20 mph zones in residential streets in cities, towns and villages, particularly where the streets are being used by people on foot and on bicycles, there is community support and the characteristics of the street are suitable.
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